Tuesday, December 14, 2010

GRADE 9: REPRODUCTION IN PLANTS

RESEARCH ON TE FOLLOWING:
1. Identify and draw the sepals, petals, stamens, anthers, carpels, ovaries and stigmas of one, locally available, named, insect pollinated, dicotyledonous flower.
2. State the functions of the sepals, petals, anthers, stigmas and ovaries.
3. Define pollination
4. Name the agents of pollination.
5. State the environmental conditions that affect germination of seeds.
6. Compare the different structural adaptations of insect-pollinated and wind-pollinated flowers.
7. Investigate and describe the structure of a non-endospermic seed in terms of the embryo (radicle, plumule and cotyledons) and testa, protected by the fruit.

Friday, December 10, 2010

GRADE 8: RESPIRATON

Research on the following:
NOTE: A QUIZ WILL BE GIVEN ON JANUARY 10, 2011 BASED ON THIS RESEARCH.
1. What is the Heimlich maneuver?
2. Explain the phases or stage of respiration.
3. Compare the two kinds of respiration completely.
4. How does respiration in humans differ from that in a fish and an amoeba?
5. How is the structure of the air sac adapted to perform its function?
6. Explain why the rate of breathing increases in over crowded area.
7. Fermentation.
8. The carbon monoxide emitted by vehicles, which you inhale, prevents oxygen from attaching to your blood cells. Explain how this affects the respiratory system.
9. List all the name of the organs and its functions of the respiratory system.
10. The effects of smoking on a person.
11. What is second hand smoking and its effect?
12. The chemicals that are found in a cigar.

Tuesday, November 9, 2010

GRADE 10: PREPARATION

ALL GRADE 10 WILL PREPARE FOR THE PRESENTATION ON GENETICS

NOTE: I WILL NOT SEE ANYONE NOT DOING THEIR ASSIGNED TASKS.

Monday, November 8, 2010

GRADE 9: TRANSPORT IN PLANTS

RESEARCH ON THE FOLLOWING:
1. How are plant roots adapted to absorb water from the soil?
2. How is water lifted against gravity from the ground to the leaves?
3. How is phloem adapted for its function?
4. How is a xylem vessel adapted for its function?
5. How are the vascular tissues organized in roots?
6. How are the vascular tissues organized in stems?
7. How can we study the path water takes through a plant?
8. How does water enter a plant? detailed.
9. How do root hairs absorb ions or mineral salts?
10. How is the root hair cell adapted to its function of absorption?
11. What is root pressure?
12. What is transpiration?
13. What is capillary action?
14. How is transpiration involved in moving water against gravity?
15. What are the importance of transpiration?
16. What are the factors that affect the rate of transpiration?
17. What is a leaf boundary layer?

Thursday, November 4, 2010

GRADE 8: DIGESTION

RESEARCH ON THE FOLLOWING. COPY AND ANSWER IN A TEST PAPER.
1. What is an enzyme?
2. How does enzymes help organisms?
3. Compare the human digestive system with those of other animals. (3 kinds)
4. Identify the problems of a bad digestive system?
5. What is a dietitian?
6. How do villi aid in absorption?
7. What is Heartburn?
8. State the role of the liver in carbohydrate and fat metabolism.
9. What is the hypothalamus of the brain?
10. What is a barium meal?
11. List all the glands in the body with its function.
12. How do cows digest a cellulose diet?


Wednesday, October 27, 2010

GRADE 10: Punett Square

1. What is a punett square?
2. What are the kinds of punett square?
3. Research about the origin of the punett square.
4. Find and show worked examples using the punett square.

Wednesday, October 20, 2010

GRADE 10: GENETICS

1. Compare Mitosis and Meiosis completely with diagram.
2. Research about the structure of a gene.
3. How does DNA gets replicated?
4. List and explain hereditary diseases. As many as you can find.
5. What is co-dominance and incomplete dominance?

GRADE 9: Animal and Plant Nutrition

Research on the following for your portfolio:
1. What are mycoprotein?
2. Parts of a tooth. Search for a longitudinal section diagram of a tooth.
3. Research about food additives
a. What are the different types of food additives?
b. What food contains it.
c. What is the use or function of every food additive?
4. Research about the villus and its purpose in the body.
5. How do bile salts help in the digestion of fats?
6. What are the digestive juices that is secreted by the duodenum of the small intestine?
7. What is a sphincter muscle, where is it found and its function in the body?
8. What is a balanced diet? Prepare a balanced diet for one day.
9. How do digested food gets assimilated with the body?
10. How does fiber prevents constipation?
11. What is obesity? What are the risks or serious health problems that it causes?
12. What is kwashiorkor?
13. What are the limiting factors for a plant in manufacturing food?
14. What is a green house?
15. What is a biuret solution, benedict solution and iodine? How are they used?
16. Which plant has the largest leaf ever recorded?
17. How is glucose used in by plants?
18. What are the adaptations of leaves for photosynthesis?
19. What is a condensation reaction?
20. What is a hydrolictic reaction?
21. What is a gall stone and how does it affect the body?
22. How to prevent gallstones?
23. What is the difference between a fat and an oil?
24. What is Transpiration and its importance? How do big trees use it?
25. Research about humidity and its importance?
26. What is a potometer and how is it used?
27. Research about the carbon cycle.
28. What mineral salts are needed by the plants? Explain their use for the plant.
29. Research about the willow tree experiment by Joannes Baptista van Helmont.
30. How does a plant get destarched?

Friday, October 15, 2010

GRADE 9: YOGURT

1. DESCRIBE THE USE OF MICROORGANISM IN THE MANUFACTURE OF YOGURT.
2. SEARCH FOR THE RECIPE AND PROCEDURE ON HOW TO MAKE A YOGURT.
3. DESCRIBE DIFFERENT DEFICIENCY SYNDROMES. SUCH AS LACK IN VIT C OR PROTEIN...... ETC

Tuesday, September 21, 2010

GRADE 10: GENETICS


RESEARCH ON THE FOLLOWING:

1. Explain through an example how the two general sets of factors, heredity and environment determine characteristics of an organism.

2. Gregor Mendel's life and works.

3. Why did Mendel make a good choice with his peas?

4. What do the terms dominant and recessive mean?

5. What is the law of segregation?

6. What is a sex linked trait?

7. What is a sex influenced trait?

8. what is a sex limited trait?

9. What is a non-mendelian inheritance?

10. What causes mutation?

11. Who is Thomas Hunt Morgan?

12. How did Morgan's discovery differ from Mendel's?

13. How is blood type inherited?

14. Special cases of heredity.

15. Hybridization.

16. Selection and Inbreeding.

17. Genetic improvements on humans.

GRADE 9: NUTRIENTS


RESEARCH ON THE FOLLOWING:
1. What is food? explain its use in the body of an organism.
2. What is meant by essential and non essential amino acids? How do we get it?
3. In what way is a calorie related to a change in weight?
4. What vitamin deficiency will a pure vegetarian most likely suffer from?
5. People can survive a short time without most nutrients, but they must have water regularly. Why?
6. What is energy?
7. What is a flamingo milk?
8. How does the body control heat loss?
9. How do cholesterol lead to heart disease?
10. How is starch hydrolyzed by enzymes?
11. Explain the quality of proteins.
12. Problems of world food supply.
13. Balanced diet.

Wednesday, September 1, 2010

ENZYMES

Research on the following:
1. How do enzymes alter the rate of chemical reactions?
2. What are the industrial applications of enzymes?
3. How are enzymes affected by pH level?
4. What are co-enzymes?
5. How are enzymes affected by temperature?

NOTE: PORTFOLIO SUBMISSION IS ON SEPTEMBER 27 - OCTOBER 1

Wednesday, August 25, 2010

Enzymes

Research about the LOCK AND KEY THEORY of enzymes. Draw a diagram of this theory in an A4 paper. Be ready to EXPLAIN it individually next week. Good Luck.

Thursday, July 29, 2010

GRADE 9: DIFFUSION

Research about the following:
1. The state of equilibrium in being reached in diffusion.
2. Why do plants wilt? How can wilting be controlled?
3. Explain why animal cells do n0t build up turgor pressure.
4. Tissue culture.
5. Reverse osmosis.
6. IONS
7. How to measure the rate of Osmosis.
8. Experiments that involves movement of water.

NOTE: Save your work first, the submission date will follow.

Tuesday, July 27, 2010

RESEARCH

ALL research should be saved first and will b submitted at the end of each TERM inside the PORTFOLIO!!!
Research on the following:
1. History of the Cell Theory.
2. Cell parts that have membranes.
3. The function of the Cell Wall in Plants
4. The importance of ER in the synthesis of protein.
5. What are LYSOSOMES and why are they considered as "suicidal sacs"?
6. How can a Paramecium perform all cell processes?
7. Where would you find more mitochondria? Explain.
8. Comparison between an animal cell and a plant cell.
9. Prokaryotes.
10. New discoveries about CELL.

Friday, April 9, 2010

GRADE 10: RESEARCH

Note: All research will be done individually then compiled by group. The deadline for submission is on April 23, 2010. Research for the following Nervous System Diseases EXTENSIVELY.
  1. Alzheimer Disease
  2. Broca Aphasia
  3. Cerebello-Olivary Degeneration of Holmes
  4. Choroid Plexus Papilloma
  5. Huntington Disease
  6. Kluver-Bucy Syndrome
  7. Locked-in Syndrome
  8. Multiple Sclerosis
  9. Parkinson Disease
  10. Parinaud Syndrome
  11. Pituiray Adenoma
  12. Tourette Syndrome
  13. Wallenberg Syndrome
  14. Weber Syndrome
  15. Wernicke Aphasia
  16. Korsakoff Syndrome
  17. Wilson Disease

Tuesday, March 9, 2010

TO ALL: RIVER MONSTER!

WHAT KIND OF MONSTER LURKS UNDER THE RIVER?

video

Friday, March 5, 2010

GRADE 8: TOP NOTCHERS



CONGRATULATIONS!

1 Eugene 96% PreIB - 1

2 Fuji 92% PreIB - 2

3 Karina 89% PreIb - 1

4 Sinta 88% PreIB - 1

5 Melinda 87% PreIB - 1

6 Angela 87% PreIB - 2

7 Ivan 86% PreIb - 2

8 Chelsea 84% PreIB - 3

9 Natasha 84% PreIB - 1

10 Phoebe 83% PreIB - 3

KEEP IT UP!!!

Tuesday, March 2, 2010

GRADE 7: HIGH FLYERS


CONGRATULATIONS!!!

TOP 10

1. Stephanie 100% Preib -2
2. Natasha 97% Preib- 3
3. Brahma 97% Preib-2
4. Evan 96% Preib-1
5. Sebastian 95% Preib-2
6. Josiah 92% Preib-2
7. Harman 92% Preib-3
8. Jesslyn 92% Preib-3
9. Crystal 91% Preib-1
10. Nissi 90% Preib-3

Wednesday, February 24, 2010

GRADE8: THE HEART

The heart weighs between 7 and 15 ounces (200 to 425 grams) and is a little larger than the size of your fist. By the end of a long life, a person's heart may have beat (expanded and contracted) more than 3.5 billion times. In fact, each day, the average heart beats 100,000 times, pumping about 2,000 gallons (7,571 liters) of blood.

Anatomy of the Heart

Your heart is located between your lungs in the middle of your chest, behind and slightly to the left of your breastbone (sternum). A double-layered membrane called the pericardium surrounds your heart like a sac. The outer layer of the pericardium surrounds the roots of your heart's major blood vessels and is attached by ligaments to your spinal column, diaphragm, and other parts of your body. The inner layer of the pericardium is attached to the heart muscle. A coating of fluid separates the two layers of membrane, letting the heart move as it beats, yet still be attached to your body.

Your heart has 4 chambers. The upper chambers are called the left and right atria, and the lower chambers are called the left and right ventricles. A wall of muscle called the septum separates the left and right atria and the left and right ventricles. The left ventricle is the largest and strongest chamber in your heart. The left ventricle's chamber walls are only about a half-inch thick, but they have enough force to push blood through the aortic valve and into your body.

The Heart Valves

Four types of valves regulate blood flow through your heart:

  • The tricuspid valve regulates blood flow between the right atrium and right ventricle.
  • The pulmonary valve controls blood flow from the right ventricle into the pulmonary arteries, which carry blood to your lungs to pick up oxygen.
  • The mitral valve lets oxygen-rich blood from your lungs pass from the left atrium into the left ventricle.
  • The aortic valve opens the way for oxygen-rich blood to pass from the left ventricle into the aorta, your body's largest artery, where it is delivered to the rest of your body.

Friday, February 12, 2010

Tuesday, February 2, 2010

GRADE 8: SMOKING


Side Effects of Smoking Cigarettes
  1. The mixture of nicotine and carbon monoxide in each cigarette you smoke temporarily increases your heart rate and blood pressure, straining your heart and blood vessels.
  2. This can cause heart attacks and stroke. It slows your blood flow, cutting off oxygen to your feet and hands. Some smokers end up having their limbs
    amputated
    .
  3. Tar coats your lungs like soot in a chimney and causes cancer. A 20-a-day smoker breathes in up to a full cup (210 g) of tar in a year.
  4. Carbon monoxide robs your muscles, brain and body tissue of oxygen, making your whole body and especially your heart work harder. Over time, your airways swell up and let less air into your lungs.
  5. Smoking causes disease and is a slow way to die. The strain of smoking effects on the body often causes years of suffering. Emphysema is an illness that slowly rots your lungs. People with emphysema often get bronchitis again and again, and suffer lung and heart failure.
  6. Lung cancer from smoking is caused by the tar in tobacco smoke. Men who smoke are ten times more likely to die from lung cancer than non-smokers.
  7. Smoking causes fat deposits to narrow and block blood vessels which leads to heart attack.
  8. Cigarette smoking during pregnancy increases the risk of low birth weight, prematurity, spontaneous abortion, and perinatal mortality in humans, which has been referred to as the fetal tobacco syndrome.

GRADE 10: IMMORTAL CELL


Medical researchers use laboratory-grown human cells to learn the intricacies of how cells work and test theories about the causes and treatment of diseases. The cell lines they need are “immortal”—they can grow indefinitely, be frozen for decades, divided into different batches and shared among scientists. In 1951, a scientist at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland, created the first immortal human cell line with a tissue sample taken from a young black woman with cervical cancer. Those cells, called HeLa cells, quickly became invaluable to medical research—though their donor remained a mystery for decades. In her new book, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, journalist Rebecca Skloot tracks down the story of the source of the amazing HeLa cells, Henrietta Lacks, and documents the cell line's impact on both modern medicine and the Lacks family.

Who was Henrietta Lacks?
She was a black tobacco farmer from southern Virginia who got cervical cancer when she was 30. A doctor at Johns Hopkins took a piece of her tumor without telling her and sent it down the hall to scientists there who had been trying to grow tissues in culture for decades without success. No one knows why, but her cells never died.

Why are her cells so important?
Henrietta’s cells were the first immortal human cells ever grown in culture. They were essential to developing the polio vaccine. They went up in the first space missions to see what would happen to cells in zero gravity. Many scientific landmarks since then have used her cells, including cloning, gene mapping and in vitro fertilization.

There has been a lot of confusion over the years about the source of HeLa cells. Why?
When the cells were taken, they were given the code name HeLa, for the first two letters in Henrietta and Lacks. Today, anonymizing samples is a very important part of doing research on cells. But that wasn’t something doctors worried about much in the 1950s, so they weren’t terribly careful about her identity. When some members of the press got close to finding Henrietta’s family, the researcher who’d grown the cells made up a pseudonym—Helen Lane—to throw the media off track. Other pseudonyms, like Helen Larsen, eventually showed up, too. Her real name didn’t really leak out into the world until the 1970s.

How did you first get interested in this story?
I first learned about Henrietta in 1988. I was 16 and a student in a community college biology class. Everybody learns about these cells in basic biology, but what was unique about my situation was that my teacher actually knew Henrietta’s real name and that she was black. But that’s all he knew. The moment I heard about her, I became obsessed: Did she have any kids? What do they think about part of their mother being alive all these years after she died? Years later, when I started being interested in writing, one of the first stories I imagined myself writing was hers. But it wasn’t until I went to grad school that I thought about trying to track down her family.

How did you win the trust of Henrietta’s family?
Part of it was that I just wouldn’t go away and was determined to tell the story. It took almost a year even to convince Henrietta’s daughter, Deborah, to talk to me. I knew she was desperate to learn about her mother. So when I started doing my own research, I’d tell her everything I found. I went down to Clover, Virginia, where Henrietta was raised, and tracked down her cousins, then called Deborah and left these stories about Henrietta on her voice mail. Because part of what I was trying to convey to her was I wasn’t hiding anything, that we could learn about her mother together. After a year, finally she said, fine, let’s do this thing.

When did her family find out about Henrietta’s cells?
Twenty-five years after Henrietta died, a scientist discovered that many cell cultures thought to be from other tissue types, including breast and prostate cells, were in fact HeLa cells. It turned out that HeLa cells could float on dust particles in the air and travel on unwashed hands and contaminate other cultures. It became an enormous controversy. In the midst of that, one group of scientists tracked down Henrietta’s relatives to take some samples with hopes that they could use the family’s DNA to make a map of Henrietta’s genes so they could tell which cell cultures were HeLa and which weren’t, to begin straightening out the contamination problem.

So a postdoc called Henrietta’s husband one day. But he had a third-grade education and didn’t even know what a cell was. The way he understood the phone call was: “We’ve got your wife. She’s alive in a laboratory. We’ve been doing research on her for the last 25 years. And now we have to test your kids to see if they have cancer.” Which wasn’t what the researcher said at all. The scientists didn’t know that the family didn’t understand. From that point on, though, the family got sucked into this world of research they didn’t understand, and the cells, in a sense, took over their lives.

Monday, February 1, 2010

GRADE 7: ECHINODERMATA

Echinoderm means "spiny skin."Echinodermata always starts from a larvae stage and has approximately 7000 described living species and about 13,000 extinct species known from the fossil record. This phylum is the largest without any freshwater or terrestrial forms. Mainly a marine group, echinoderms are found in all the oceans.
An internal skeleton is present throughout members of the phylum. The skeletal and muscular arrangement varies among groups but mostly RADIALLY SYMMETRICAL. It also has a poorly defined open circulatory system. The OSSICLES are calcareous plates buried in the fleshy region beneath the outer skin. This represents the endoskeletonwhich gives the body rigidity and support. Echinoderms in general are most vulnerable in their larval stage. As adults, asteroids have an anti-predator adaptation where they can lose an arm to a predator and the arm is later regenerated. Sea urchin eggs are also edible and often served in sushi bars. Echinodermata includes the starfish, sea urchins, brittle stars, sea cucumbers and feather stars.

Friday, January 29, 2010

POLL ANSWER!!!


This is the answer for the last poll question...

No. Genetic Mutation Leaves Felines Unable to Taste Sugar, as they lack receptors to identify sweet from other kinds of taste.

Humans have 9,000 taste buds on their toungue. Pigs have 15,000; dogs, 1,700; cats only 475. That's why smell is so important to cats, and why cats who can't smell don't want to eat. The finicky feline has quite a different menu from the dog. To begin with, cats are strictly carnivores. They need certain amino acids that can only be acquired though eating meat to get these animal proteins. If cats do not get these specific amino acids, such as Taurine, they will become very ill and can even die. We’ve established that meats with the essential amino acids are definitely on the cat menu, but what type of meat is their favourite? Fish is probably the first answer that pops to mind. After all, fish and cats just seem to ‘go together.’ Though many cats prefer fish to meat, this varies greatly among individuals. Some may even dislike the taste of fish! Let’s tackle another myth: milk, although many cats may appear to savour its taste, it is very unhealthy for them!

Cats do not have the enzymes necessary to properly digest milk. This can lead to health issues. If you’re thinking, “Wow, cats sure are picky!” you have not seen anything yet! Here’s the kicker: cats pay a LOT of attention to the texture, size and shape of their food. This is universal for all cats though. Each cat likes certain types of food based on these, and other requirements. Some cats become so accustomed to their kibble at a young age that they will not eat anything else. Others will randomly decide they do not like their food anymore multiple times throughout their lives. Basically, the cat menu for favourite foods is just as fickle as our felines. They share the love of fatty meat that smells good with dogs, but the texture size and shape are just as important in determination of a favourite food.

Tuesday, January 12, 2010

7TH GRADERS: ANIMAL KINGDOM

9 DIVISIONS OF THE ANIMAL KINGDOM!

1. Porifera, the Sponges.
2. Coelenterata, the Hydras.
3. Platyhelminthes, Flatwoms.
4. Nemathelminthes, Roundworms.
5. Annelida, Segmented Roundworms.
6. Mollusca, the Soft-bodied animals.
7. Arthropoda, Jointed legs.
8. Chordata. Animals w/ Backbone
9. Echinodermata. Star Fishes.

Friday, January 8, 2010

NEW YEAR.... NEW BEGINNINGS....


HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL!!!!

Its been a while since i have updated our site because of the holidays. A new year means another opportunity to make things right and a way to improve one's self. Everyone will have a chance to have a fresh start as scores will start from scratch again.

STUDY HARDER AND GOOD LUCK!